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GLASTONBURY, UNITED KINGDOM

Email:  Witchcraft Shop

HERBS - (C)




82 items found

CHLORELLA POWDER
chlorella vulgaris
Amount:     

CHRYSANTHEMUM FLOWERS
Chrysanthemum morifolium.

Top quality flowers.
Amount:     

CINCHONA BARK - RED
Cinchona spp.

Care - toxic in certain conditions - source of quinine and used for tonics.


Amount:     

CINCHONA BARK - YELLOW
Cinchona calisaya

Strongest source of quinine in the 30 or so Cinchona species, and used in the making of commercial and indeed artesanal Tonic Waters.

Considered pharmaceutically TOXIC - which is odd given its proven ability to alleviate or cure malaria (it is indeed the very herb that started the Homeopathy movement).

HOWEVER, as we are responsible and careful herbal users ourselves, we advise taking great care using this herb, and consulting your local herbalist.
Amount:     

CINNAMON - CHOPPED
cinnamomum zeylanicum -

this is chopped fine - ideal for incense mixes - or indeed culinary use.....
Amount:     

CINNAMON - GROUND
Cinnamomum zeylanicum.

this is powdered - culinary grade
Amount:     

CINNAMON - STICKS
Cinnamomum zeylanicum

Sticks - whole or part depending on quantity
Amount:     

CINQUEFOIL (TORMENTIL) HERB
Herb/leaf.

Potentilla Erecta.

Please note this is prepared/chopped from dried bunches of top growth.

Amount:     

CLARY SAGE
Salvia Sclarea
Amount:     

CLIVERS HERB
Galium aperine.

A good diuretic - use with caution.
Amount:     

CLOVE - GROUND
Eugenia caryophyllata.
Amount:     

CLOVE - WHOLE
Eugenia caryophyllata.
Amount:     

CLUB MOSS
Lycopodium clavatum

Amount:     

CODONOPSIS ROOT / DANG SHEN
Codonopsis pilosula

Chinese - special order - add a few days.
Amount:     

COLA NUTS CRUSHED
Cola nitida

A great tonic and a good general base for many herbal teas -

Amount:     

COLEUS ROOT
Coleus forksohlii



Amount:     

COLEUS ROOT
coleus forskohlii
Amount:     

COLTSFOOT FLOWERS
Tussilago farfara
Amount:     

COLTSFOOT LEAF
Tussilago farfara
Amount:     

COMFREY LEAF
Symphitum officinale
Amount:     

COMFREY ROOT
Symphitum officinale
Amount:     

COMMON WIREWEED HERB
sida acuta
Amount:     

CONDURANGO BARK
Marsdenia condurango
Amount:     

CONEFLOWER ROOT (ANGUSTIFOLIA)
Echinacea angustifolia
Amount:     

CONEFLOWER ROOT (PALLIDA)
Echinacea pallida
Amount:     

CONEFLOWER ROOT (PURPUREA)
Echinacea purpurea
Amount:     

COPTIS / CHINESE GOLDEN SEAL
Coptis Chinensis
Amount:     

CORIANDER GROUND
Coriandrum sativum
Amount:     

CORIANDER LEAF
Coriandrum sativum
Amount:     

CORIANDER SEED
Coriandrum sativum

Amount:     

CORNFLOWER PETALS
Centaurea cyanus
Amount:     

CORNSILK
Zea mays
Amount:     

CORYDALIS ROOT/ YAN HU SUO - CHOPPED
Corydalis yanhusuo
Amount:     

COUCHGRASS RHIZOME
Agropyron repens
Amount:     

COWSLIP FLOWERS
Primula veris



Amount:     

COWSLIP ROOT
Primula veris

Amount:     

CRAMP BARK
Viburnum Opulus

Amount:     

CRANESBILL ROOT
Geranium maculatum


Amount:     

CRYPTOLEPIS ROOT
cryptolepis sanguinolenta
Amount:     

CUMIN - GROUND
Cuminum cyminum

General Information

Cumin is the seed of a small umbelliferous plant. The seeds come as paired or separate carpels, and are 3-6mm (1/8-1/4 in) long. They have a striped pattern of nine ridges and oil canals, and are hairy, brownish in colour, boat-shaped, tapering at each extremity, with tiny stalks attached. They resemble caraway seeds, but are lighter in colour and unlike caraway, have minute bristles hardly visible to the naked eye. They are available dried, or ground to a brownish-green powder. Cumin is freely available in the West, although it is not a traditional European spice.
Bouquet: Strong, heavy and warm. A spicy-sweet aroma.
Flavour: Pungent, powerful, sharp and slightly bitter.
Hotness: Medium

Medicinal Use

Cumin is stomachic, diuretic, carminative, stimulant, astringent, emmenagogic and antispasmodic. It is valuable in dyspepsia diarrhoea and hoarseness, and may relieve flatulence and colic. In the West, it is now used mainly in veterinary medicine, as a carminative, but it remains a traditional herbal remedy in the East. It is supposed to increase lactation and reduce nausea in pregnancy. Used in a poultice, it relieves swelling of the breast or the testicles. Smoke in a pipe with ghee, it is taken to relieve the hiccups, Cumin stimulates the appetite.

Traditional Use

Cumin is used mainly where highly spiced foods are preferred. It features in Indian, Eastern, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Portuguese and Spanish cookery. It is an ingredient of most curry powders and many savoury spice mixtures, and is used in stews, grills - especially lamb - and chicken dishes. It gives bite to plain rice, and to beans and cakes. Small amounts can be usefully used in aubergine and kidney bean dishes. Cumin is essential in spicy Mexican foods such as chile con carne, casseroled pork and enchiladas with chili sauce. In Europe, cumin flavours certain Portuguese sausages, and is used to spice cheese, especially Dutch Leyden and German Munster, and burned with woods to smoke cheeses and meats. It is a pickling ingredient for cabbage and Sauerkraut, and is used in chutneys. In the Middle East, it is a familiar spice for fish dishes, grills and stews and flavours couscous - semolina steamed over meat and vegetables, the national dish of Morocco. Zeera pani is a refreshing and appetising Indian drink made from cumin and tamarind water. Cumin together with caraway flavours Kummel, the famous German liquer
Amount:     

CUMIN SEED
Cuminum cyminum

General Information

Cumin is the seed of a small umbelliferous plant. The seeds come as paired or separate carpels, and are 3-6mm (1/8-1/4 in) long. They have a striped pattern of nine ridges and oil canals, and are hairy, brownish in colour, boat-shaped, tapering at each extremity, with tiny stalks attached. They resemble caraway seeds, but are lighter in colour and unlike caraway, have minute bristles hardly visible to the naked eye. They are available dried, or ground to a brownish-green powder. Cumin is freely available in the West, although it is not a traditional European spice.
Bouquet: Strong, heavy and warm. A spicy-sweet aroma.
Flavour: Pungent, powerful, sharp and slightly bitter.
Hotness: Medium

Medicinal Use

Cumin is stomachic, diuretic, carminative, stimulant, astringent, emmenagogic and antispasmodic. It is valuable in dyspepsia diarrhoea and hoarseness, and may relieve flatulence and colic. In the West, it is now used mainly in veterinary medicine, as a carminative, but it remains a traditional herbal remedy in the East. It is supposed to increase lactation and reduce nausea in pregnancy. Used in a poultice, it relieves swelling of the breast or the testicles. Smoke in a pipe with ghee, it is taken to relieve the hiccups, Cumin stimulates the appetite.

Traditional Use

Cumin is used mainly where highly spiced foods are preferred. It features in Indian, Eastern, Middle Eastern, Mexican, Portuguese and Spanish cookery. It is an ingredient of most curry powders and many savoury spice mixtures, and is used in stews, grills - especially lamb - and chicken dishes. It gives bite to plain rice, and to beans and cakes. Small amounts can be usefully used in aubergine and kidney bean dishes. Cumin is essential in spicy Mexican foods such as chile con carne, casseroled pork and enchiladas with chili sauce. In Europe, cumin flavours certain Portuguese sausages, and is used to spice cheese, especially Dutch Leyden and German Munster, and burned with woods to smoke cheeses and meats. It is a pickling ingredient for cabbage and Sauerkraut, and is used in chutneys. In the Middle East, it is a familiar spice for fish dishes, grills and stews and flavours couscous - semolina steamed over meat and vegetables, the national dish of Morocco. Zeera pani is a refreshing and appetising Indian drink made from cumin and tamarind water. Cumin together with caraway flavours Kummel, the famous German liquer

Amount:     

CURRY LEAVES
Murraya koenigii

Culinary herb
Amount:     

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